Singapore Airlines has just released a new business class seat for their new A380s, set to debut December of this year.

The new seat, created by JPA Design, has a curved pod design for more privacy and “suite-like” feel. To take it even further, Singapore Airlines has modified the basic design to suit its market and brand—adding in elegance, comfort and luxury beyond the original concept.

Singapore Airlines new business class

(Image source: Australian Business Traveller)

Each seat faces forward, and the cabin has been configured into a 1-2-1 layout for direct aisle access. The seats have also been formed to interlock with the seat(s) directly in front of it, an efficient way to add more seats without compromising the passenger’s space or comfort. What’s even better? The two middle seats convert into a double bed. Yes, business class offers a bed for passengers traveling in groups—something you don’t ever see in the business class cabin.

Seats located on the left and right sides can also convert into a fully-flat bed that measures 78 inches—the perfect amount of space to stretch out without feeling too confined.

New Business Class Seat Singapore Airlines

(Image source: Australian Business Traveller)

As you can imagine, the new seat feels very high-tech, with nooks for all your devices (within hands reach), an 18 inch High Definition screen with hundreds of hours of entertainment, as well as eXport, HDMI and USB ports to keep your devices charged at all times.

The A380 will have a total of 78 business class seats, divided into three sections (50, 20 and 8 seats), which will all be located on the lower level. First class has been moved to the upper deck in order to create a more “premium” cabin experience for those who are paying top-dollar for their seat.

With carriers like Qantas, who just released new business class seats on their Dreamliner, Qatar Airways, and now Singapore Airlines, it’s only in due time that other major carriers will follow suit. Travelers are raising the bar of expectations, and airlines are making moves to meet their demands.